Plastic Bank

The Plastic Bank is an organization setting out to stop ocean plastic and poverty by turning waste into currency! The Plastic Bank is a root cause solution to prevent the flow of plastic into our oceans using Blockchain technology.

Partnering with IBM to unite & empower recycling ecosystems to safely transfer as much value as possible into the hands of collectors, Plastic Bank’s mission is to stop Ocean Plastic by gathering a billion people together to monetize waste while improving lives.

Plastic Bank was the featured solution to stop Ocean plastic in the award-winning documentary A Plastic Ocean. They received the prestigious Sustainia Community Award at COP21 during the Paris Climate Summit, the RCBC innovation award, and recently their new Blockchain exchange & incentives platform received an IBM Beacon Award.

Visit their website to find out more on how you can get involved, their work in Haiti and many other videos!

Cora Ball

 

A hard truth to swallow, but according to Rozalia Project, we are eating our fleece! Rozalia Project has developed the Cora Ball microfiber catcher, the first human-scale, consumer solution to synthetic microfiber pollution in our ocean, lakes and rivers. Check out their successful Kickstarter Campaign here: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/879498424/cora-ball-microfiber-catching-laundry-ball

The single biggest pollution problem facing our ocean is microfiber: trillions of pieces of tiny fibers flowing into the ocean – every time we use our washing machines. Our clothing is breaking up, sending this microfiber (made of plastic and chemical-covered non-plastics) out with the drain water – just one fleece jacket could shed up to 250,000 pieces per garment per wash [source]. New York City, alone, could have 6.8 billion microfibers flowing into its harbor every day. We are all contributing to this problem. Learn more about the problem of microfiber pollution herehttp://rozaliaproject.org/stop-microfiber-pollution/

Graphene-based Seawater Sieve

A UK-based team of researchers has created a graphene-based sieve capable of removing salt from seawater.

The sought-after development could aid the millions of people without ready access to clean drinking water.

The promising graphene oxide sieve could be highly efficient at filtering salts, and will now be tested against existing desalination membranes.

It has previously been difficult to manufacture graphene-based barriers on an industrial scale.

Reporting their results in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, scientists from the University of Manchester, led by Dr Rahul Nair, show how they solved some of the challenges by using a chemical derivative called graphene oxide.

Isolated and characterised by a University of Manchester-led team in 2004, graphene comprises a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice. Its unusual properties, such as extraordinary tensile strength and electrical conductivity, have earmarked it as one of the most promising materials for future applications.

But it has been difficult to produce large quantities of single-layer graphene using existing methods, such as chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Current production routes are also quite costly.

On the other hand, said Dr Nair, “graphene oxide can be produced by simple oxidation in the lab”.

He told BBC News: “As an ink or solution, we can compose it on a substrate or porous material. Then we can use it as a membrane.

“In terms of scalability and the cost of the material, graphene oxide has a potential advantage over single-layered graphene.”

(Visit the source article via BBC news online!)

RanMarine WasteShark

Founded by Richard Hardiman, Ranmarine Technology uses WasteShark — 24-hour on-the-water drones. The solar-powered drones collect detritus, marine waste and chemical substances from ports and canals.

Founded in 2015 in South Africa, the company was later re-incorporated in the Netherlands at the start of last year as RanMarine Technology BV.

Hardiman is based in Rotterdam. He moved there after being selected for PortXL Rotterdam’s maritime accelerator (portxl.org) in February last year. The startup was one of 12 companies selected from 1000 startups worldwide.

In July last year the startup began a pilot with the Port of Rotterdam to test both the use of autonomous surface vessels in their waters and how the product actually works in “high trafficked waters”. The pilot was successfully completed last month.

There are currently 3 different types of the Waste Shark products: the WasteShark, the Great WasteShark and the ChemShark.

Check out their website https://www.ranmarine.io/ for more info and videos!

The Climate Mobilization

Why join the mobilization?

Well, the planet is warming and its okay to be afraid. Climate change threatens the collapse of civilization within this century. Confronting this crisis is the great moral imperative of our time.

The Climate Mobilization is a grassroots movement which demands a government-led mobilization to restore a safe climate;  calls for full employment and fair, shared sacrifice; demands a rapid transformation of our energy and agriculture systems; and calls on politicians to pledge to mobilize.

Visit their site www.theclimatemobilization.org to learn more and get involved!

(Photo is adapted from The Climate Mobilization “Blueprint for a Climate Emergency Movement”)

Surfrider Foundation

With roughly 80 chapters in 10 regions around the globe, the Surfrider Foundation has a blueprint for success that transforms passion into protection, which is mobilized in local communities, all across the U.S..  Their network campaigns for the ocean as issues arise and proactively works on programs to help keep beaches healthy. Whether it is for clean water, the ecology and environment of the beach, erosion, rising sea levels, the impacts of development, to keep the ocean’s clean and safe for the next generation…there are lots of reasons volunteers are showing up to make a difference in their local communities.

Visit their website www.surfrider.org to find your local chapter and get involved!

Earth Overshoot Day

has arrived. The world has consumed more natural resources than the world can renew throughout the whole of the year.

We use more ecological resources and services than nature can regenerate through overfishing, overharvesting forests, and emitting more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than forests can sequester.

Global Footprint Network, an international research organization, is marking Earth Overshoot Day this year with the launch of a new mobile-friendly Footprint calculator. Try it out yourself at www.footprintcalculator.org.

The new Footprint Calculator allows users to measure their own demand on nature (Ecological Footprint) and assess their personal Earth Overshoot Day. A user’s personal Earth Overshoot day is the date Earth Overshoot Day would be if all people had their Footprint.

Check out source website for more information: http://www.overshootday.org/

CEF FFT: Imagine if everyone in the world knew what their personal footprint was on the planet! What kind of impact could this awareness bring?

Chasing Coral

Carbon emissions continue to be unleashed into the atmosphere and are gradually damaging oceanic life with the absorption of heat in the atmosphere going into the ocean.  Coral bleaching, as seen in this photo (Chasing Coral),  is a stark and foreboding indicator of the feverishly rising ocean temperatures.

The team at Exposure Labs said they knew that if they could capture visual evidence of coral bleaching, they could reveal the phenomenon to the world in a powerful way.

Their documentary film Chasing Coral, which took more than three years to shoot was the result of 500+ hours underwater, submissions of footage from volunteers from 30 countries, as well as support from more than 500 people from various locations around the world.

They didn’t just stop there, there are a variety of ways to connect, understand the impact of climate change and get involved on their website with their action guide: chasingcoral.com

Coral is integral to the health of the oceans and marine life, and in turn, humanity. Watch the film, visit their site, share with friends and help get involved to join the global efforts to save the oceans!

UN Sustainable Development Goals

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), officially known as Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is a set of 17 “Global Goals” with 169 targets between them.

To read more about each of the SDGs visit this link: http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/

Ocean Conservancy

Ocean Conservancy is the name, and international coastal cleanup is the game: “Harnessing the Power of People to Fight Ocean Trash”.

Nearly 12 million people and counting have been part of the world’s biggest volunteer effort to protect the ocean. Will you join us this year?

Today, plastic has been found in 62% of all sea birds and in 100% of sea turtle species.

A problem as big as plastic in the ocean requires a big response! By participating in the International Coastal Cleanup, you can make a difference. You’ll join millions of volunteers just like you, who love the ocean and want to protect it. This year’s International Coastal Cleanup is Saturday, September 16th, 2017.

Find a clean up near you on Ocean Conservancy’s website!