ECOSIA

Ecosia is like any other search engine, with one major difference: they use their profits to plant trees.

DECEMBER 2009: Ecosia is born. Christian founded Ecosia.org after a trip around the world helped him understand the problems of deforestation.

2009 – 2011: People’s choice. Ecosia won several awards for its clever concept and speedy growth in Europe and beyond.

APRIL 2014: First German B Corp. Ecosia was the first German company to become a B Corporation thanks to its social business model.

APRIL 2018: 25 million trees. A planting milestone! That same year, Ecosia also builds its own solar energy plant to power every search.

They plant trees where they’re needed most, their trees benefit people, the environment and local economies. They also publish their monthly financial reports so that we see exactly where the income from our search goes.

Visit ecosia.org and add the extension to your web browser to start making an impact!

New Tesla Solar Roof

Tesla’s solar roof is gradually rolling out to more homes. A new set of photos shared this week show a new installation at twilight, complete with cutouts for chimneys and other features. The design looks impressive, and it’s one of the few sightings seen on social media since the first installations appeared early last year.

The roof was shared by a now-deleted Twitter account, which was subsequently posted to Reddit by a user called “Potatochak,” where it received over 3,000 upvotes on the Tesla subreddit. The depicted tiles appear to be the textured variety, but the company also offers a smooth style depending on cosmetic appearance. Tesla recommends a normal house uses a mix of 35 percent solar tiles at $42 per square foot to 65 percent “dummy” tiles at $11 per square foot, resulting in an average price of $21.85 per square foot, but it’s unclear how many times are operational in these images.

(For the FULL ARTICLE visit: https://www.inverse.com/article/52224-tesla-solar-roof-images-of-a-new-installation-show-its-incredible-design)

Net-zero Nottingham Homes

A pilot project to turn 10 homes in Nottingham into net-zero emission properties without residents even moving out is nearing completion.

Developer Melius Homes and social landlord Nottingham City Homes have worked together on the scheme, with UK solar manufacturer Viridian Solar providing photovoltaic roofing.

The upgrades also include better insulated outside walls and upgraded heating systems. Upgraded housing is crucial so people can live in better conditions and feel safe and secure in their own home. If however you are wanting something upgraded in America as you fancy a change, then there are some excellent and luxurious houses for to explore on essex homes charlotte for you to invest in or turn into your perfect dream house. There are some beautiful properties in the UK too but if you are wanting to save financially and are wanting more out of life, and even one day own more than one property, you can build a property empire for you and your family. Maybe after checking out properties in Nottingham you will want to search further and push yourself out of your comfort zone…

After the refurbishment, tenants will pay an energy services fee instead of paying for gas and electricity.

With this guaranteed additional income, to which savings on planned maintenance costs are added, the landlord can borrow enough money to fund the upfront costs.

The goal is to drive better economies of scale so the work can be completed at an attractive price requiring no government support.

Stuart Elmes, CEO of Viridian Solar, said: “The opportunity it offers to completely regenerate whole areas of our towns and cities, increasing the value of property and improving the comfort of tenants, all financed by energy savings is amazing.”

The 10 homes in Nottingham are a pilot study, with an option to extend the programme to 400 more.

24 Hour Solar Thermal Plants

 

The Chilean government recently gave the go-ahead on a massive solar thermal plant that is expected to produce electricity 24 hours a day, seven days a week—a considerable feat for a plant that depends solely on solar energy. The plant, proposed for a site in Chile’s Tamarugal province, would consist of three 150 megawatt solar thermal towers, which become heated as mirrors placed around each tower reflect sunlight onto it.

That heat is transferred to molten salt, which circulates through the plant during the day and is stored in tanks at night. The salt, a mixture of sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate that’s kept at a balmy 1,050 degrees Fahrenheit (566 degrees Celsius), is used as a “heat transfer fluid.” As energy is needed, the salt can be dispatched to a heat exchanger, where it will lend its heat to water to create a super-heated steam. That steam is used to move a traditional steam turbine to create electricity.

The molten salt generates high quality super-heated steam to drive a standard steam turbine at maximum efficiency and generate reliable non-intermittent electricity during peak demand hours.

SolarReserve, the US-based company that proposed this project, has also proposed two others—a 260 MW, 24-hour plant near the city of Copiapó in the Atacama Region of Chile, as well as a 390 MW, 24-hour plant in the Antofagasta Region. Mary Grikas, a SolarReserve spokesperson, told Ars via e-mail that Copiapó is shovel-ready, and now Tamarugal is, too, with the Chilean government’s recent approval, which assessed the site for environmental impact. The plant in Antofagasta is still waiting on permitting approval.

Visit the source article for more info and a video!

100 Percent Green California

California’s Senate leader wants the Golden State to shift to 100 percent renewable electricity by 2045, pushing it to lead the country in grabbing that green power goal. California is already striving to reduce energy use as every building is subject to a title 24 report.

Environmentalists are cheering California Senate President Pro Tempore Kevin de León’s (D) plan to double, and accelerate, the state’s current renewables mandate of 50 percent by 2050. Oscar-winning actor Leonardo DiCaprio even tweeted his thanks to de León among his 17 million followers.

The nation’s most populous state switching to fully renewable electricity sounds idealistic. But several experts said it can be done — with a lot depending on definitions, technological advancements and acceptable price tags.

“2045 is a long way away,” said Severin Borenstein, economics professor at the University of California, Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. “A lot could happen between now and 2045.”

Energy storage through batteries “could get a lot cheaper. That could make the goal much more attainable and much more cost-effective,” he added. Wind and solar energy already are close in price to natural gas, he said. “If you could actually store the power cost-effectively, then you could make it work much more effectively.” If you’re thinking of moving to California anyway, doing so now before this energy shift so you can really benefit from the advantages once this goal has been achieved might be a wise choice, looking into real estate companies based in California such as Bright Homes Tracy CA to find your next dream home that could potentially have 100% renewable energy in years to come.

Others warned major expenses would ensue. Large-scale solar and wind projects often go in deserts or other open areas, requiring added infrastructure to move the power to cities, said Evan Birenbaum, who led the environmental strategies program at Los Angeles-area utility Southern California Edison Co. before leaving in 2014. He now heads Chai Energy, which focuses on reducing household energy consumption.

“You would need to build new transmission lines to support the incoming [renewable] power,” Birenbaum said. “Old power lines might not be able to support it.”

Utility substations also likely would need upgrades, he said, adding, “You’re talking about many billions of dollars that have to be invested in that new renewable energy future. It’s the ratepayer who will have to pay for that.”

Borenstein said that calculating how much it will cost nearly 30 years from now is “nearly impossible to answer. … Imagine going back 30 years,” when the internet-connected cellphones used now didn’t exist.

“It’s very hard to predict technology 30 years in advance,” he added.

FFT: Although goals and estimates for 100% renewable energy may not be accurate to the year, the challenge gives us perspective as we progress towards the goal. Who knows, maybe we’ll even beat it.

( Visit the full article at the Scientific America )

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/can-california-go-100-percent-green/