SeaVax – Robotic Vacuum Ship

seavax-tank-testing-pv-panels-trackingEarlier this year in March I was one of 50,476 people who donated to a campaign run by Avaaz to help get SeaVax from Phase I into Phase II.

SeaVax drones make up a team of vessels they call SeaNet that collect trash and pump it into a 150-tonne capacity holding bay. Water that gets filtered through comes out the rear of the ship.  Once the transports are full they can be transported ashore on solar powered barges so the waste can then be recycled.

They are even developing sensors for SeaVax to be able to power down when marine life is detected in its trajectory. Due to its adaptable solar panel equipment and a couple of small wind turbines, they estimate SeaVax could treat 89.9 million liters of seawater a year. BlueBird Marine Systems (maker of SeaVax) quotes the SeaVax price at around $3 million dollars per unit. The figure the cleanup cost, based on that price point would be around $1.49 USD per kg of trash collected.

The SeaVax even made an appearance at the Olympics in Rio!

Check out more on SeaVax from BlueBird Marine System’s website.

 

Let’s Do It! Clean Earth Day 2018

letsdoit_trash_cleanup_kosovo-1600x995Let’s Do It! World is an organization leading an effort to put together a worldwide cleaning day in September 2018.

Teams in countries around the world have already began setting up teams. They have multiple maps on their website sharing where teams have set things up, teams who are in the process of setting up and countries where there remains to be a team set up. Nice to have visual data.

When you land on their homepage, they have you recommend a leader to run a cleanup in your area—not a bad way of enrolling inspired individuals to gamify the process of cleaning the planet!

Check out their website for more info on how you can get involved and contribute.

Imagine if we could clean the surface of the earth all at once as a planet. What a spectacle it would be. Save the date?

Plastic-eating Worms

As it is Halloween, I thought this would be a suitable post to share on Clean Earth Future:

worms_news(Above) Plastic-eating mealworms which Stanford researchers have found to be a potential solution to the mounting of waste.

An ongoing study by Stanford engineers, in collaboration with researchers in China, shows that common mealworms can safely biodegrade various types of plastic.

New Water Drones

Through a collaboration between Port of Rotterdam Authority and academic institutions such as Erasmus University in Rotterdam and Port Innovation Lab with the Delft University of Technology new innovations in the line of “do good” drones are starting to make their appearance in the ports. Among the emerging breeds of Water Drones are the “AquaSmartXL” and the “Waste Shark”. The AquaSmartXL is a useful alternative to port surveillance that would normally require a man-operated boat burning fuel. The unmanned Waste Shark is able to collect around 500 kg of wast in the water through its mouth-like opening 35 cm below the surface of the water. It is around the size of a average four door car.

rotterdam_innovate_with_new_water_drones_600_375_84An AquaSmartXL in the port of Rotterdam.

 

wastesharkdroneportPrototype fleet of Waste Sharks along with drone port charging stations.

wastesharkAnother look at the garbage-collecting Waste Shark.

The Dutch boy mopping up a sea of plastic

_78288071_boyanseax624

Link to article: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29631332

When I first starting bringing up the discussion on earth clean up with people a few mentioned hearing about this boy named Boyan Slat a couple years back.

ocean-cleanup-array-boyan-slat

Above is a representation of his invention to clean plastic from the ocean. Inspiring to hear the efforts that are emerging.

Another article on Boyan Slat: http://inhabitat.com/19-year-old-student-develops-ocean-cleanup-array-that-could-remove-7250000-tons-of-plastic-from-the-worlds-oceans/