Wolves: The Protectors of Rivers

wolvsandtrophiccascade

We Love Animals make a fascinating point that wolves (in this case Yellowstone National Park) help to contain the dispersion of water in rivers by regulating the population of deer and other familiar prey which feed on vegetation. In the headlines to their video, they prime you that 14 wolves were released in a park within Yellowstone in 1995 and were able to see how their return and presence in their natural environment sparked the means for the land and rivers to stabilize. Check out this video to see how important they are in the whole trophic cascade of life on our amazing planet.

Whilst wolves play a massive part in keeping the river clean and dispersed, it’s also important that other people get an honorable mention too. It’s not just the predators of the Yellowstone National Park that keep the river clean and flowing efficiently. Due to the ever-increasing population of animals that feed on the vegetation in the park, it’s essential that they are controlled and regulated with the help of hunters. Both hunters and wolves can control the population of these animals. For hunters, this can be for recreational sport. By using air rifles or crossbows during the hunting season, hunters can keep the vegetation growing steadily without being eaten by these animals. For any hunters interested in visiting the Yellowstone National Park, it’s advised that they bring their own hunting equipment. If they need to purchase one beforehand, there are rifle and crossbow reviews available on Outdoor Empire, for example. That can help hunters find the best hunting equipment to ensure the population of deer, and other similar animals, are regulated in this ecosystem.

Both wolves and hunters can help to control the dispersion of water by managing the population of deer and other animals that eat the vegetation. By reducing the number of animals that eat the vegetation, rainwater will get absorbed into the ground, instead of flowing straight into the river and disrupting the natural dispersion of the water.

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